A TEXT POST

If you are incapable of delighting in absurdity now and then, I probably don’t want to be your friend.

A PHOTO

quiet-nymph:

Photography by Cissa Rego

Reblogged from Follow The Magic
A VIDEO
Reblogged from pearlsandink.
A PHOTO

cloisismyfairytale:

Happy Easter everyone!

Reblogged from APE IN A CAPE
A VIDEO

This face was my favourite part of the whole episode.

A PHOTO

strangeremains:

Syphilitic skull on display at the Hunterian Museum in London.

I always think that showing pictures of syphilitic skulls would encourage more people to go get tested for STDs.

Reblogged from Dead Men Talking
A VIDEO

I would probably have a crush on Jimmy if I knew him in person.

A VIDEO
Reblogged from long live the queen.
A QUOTE

Even though, in the novel, Margot at this stage of the story really should be 6 years old— because when she first was in therapy with Dr. Lecter, she was a little girl, and she was horribly molested, and it was very, very dark—I didn’t want to tell that story, so we generalized the sadism of Mason Verger so it wasn’t a sexual sadism. It was more, this is a bad man who, like Hannibal, gets off on what people do under certain circumstances.

In the novel, she’s a very masculine character, who has had years of steroid abuse and is a lesbian, and it was unclear to me in the novel whether she was either transgender or a lesbian as a result of those horrible abuses and that horrible childhood and [Beat.] that’s not how transgenderism or homosexuality works. So I didn’t want to contribute to that misconception of what it is to be transgender or a gay woman.

It was important for her to have a strength to her and the idea of the reason she’s going into therapy not being because she was this victim of horrible abuse. Which she is, in a different way. She grew up with a sadist, who was incredibly cruel and will be even more cruel in the future, but I like the idea that she’s in therapy because she tried to kill him, as opposed to because she was so victimized, that she had taken an active role in her victimization and had enough, tried to turn it around, and it didn’t go well for her.

A VIDEO
Reblogged from The Sonic Screwwasp
A TEXT POST

Maybe it was just my high school, but I feel like the policing of girls’ clothing has gotten worse in the decade since I’ve been out of high school?
Like I keep seeing all these posts about girls being sent home or forced to change because of skirts that aren’t knee length or spaghetti strap tops or whatever. Were schools like this when I went to high school too and it was just that *my* school wasn’t like that?

I mean we had a dress code, and once or twice someone told me I shouldn’t be wearing spaghetti straps (never got any scolding for the see-through shirts oddly), but I’m fairly certain I just responded with some variant of “that’s a stupid rule” and was allowed to go on my way. The only times I recall people being made to change was when they were wearing t-shirts with borderline pornographic things on them.

Am I way off base here? Does it make a difference that I’m Canadian?

A PHOTO

Here is a selfie I took as I was leaving work the other day. I just wanted to show off the cool jacket I got a while ago.

A PHOTO

s-w-f-s:

It always snows.

Reblogged from maybe edmonton